Recreational Music

How is it different from music therapy?

 
 

goals:

In music therapy, the music therapist, the family, and the individual select non-musical goals that are targeted during every music therapy session through musical experiences.

group formation:

In music therapy, the therapist will carefully pair clients for group work based on social cognition level (how much support they need to interact with peers).

cost and duration:

In music therapy, each client is billed for the session (at a lower rate than individual music therapy). Each month, individual progress is documented, and recommendations are made to continue or discontinue the group work.

goals:

In recreational music, the goal is to have fun making music.

group formation:

In recreational music, an individual or their family selects friends, classmates, and/or family members to attend the series of sessions.

cost and duration:

In recreational music, an individual signs up for a series of four or eight sessions. The individual is billed, and the guests attend at no additional charge. Because recreational music does not involve an assessment and treatment plan, the cost is lower than individual or group music therapy.

 
 

Recreational music is active and client-centered, which means the participants make many decisions about how time is spent. Sessions can include listening to, discussing, and recreating favorite songs, song-writing, and instrument play.